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Do Chain Slings Need to Be Load Tested After a Repair Has Been Performed?

Rigging | Safety and Training | by Gisela Clark | Dec 17, 2018


ChainSling.jpg

Xavier, a salesperson for a CMCO distributor, asks the following question:

“I am doing some research on the guidelines and laws concerning repairs made to chain slings. I found some very conflicting information from OSHA and ASME. To summarize, ASME states that chain slings do not need to be load tested after a repair has been performed. OSHA says that new and repaired chain slings must be load tested before being returned to service. I was hoping to get your opinion and maybe Columbus McKinnon’s official stance on this issue.“

Our Columbus McKinnon trainng team answers: 

Thank you for reaching out to us with your concern. This is a great question. If the chain is a welded assembly (only certain companies are authorized to do this) and a welded link was repaired, then the sling needs to be load tested. If the sling is made up of mechanical components and those components have been individually load tested by the manufacturer, no load test needs to be done. 

For example, I have a single-leg sling and I replace the top oblong link. The oblong link is connected with a mechanical coupler, such as a Hammerlok, and has been tested by the manufacturer. Under these conditions, I do not have to load test the sling, but I would recommend inspecting the sling, link by link, to be sure all components are safe to use per ASME B30.9 and OSHA 1910.184.

For additional information, check out our Chain Sling Inspection Safety Webinar or our new Rigging Catalog.